Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (CST) is popular railway station and is a spitting image of Victorian-Gothic style of architecture in India. Located in the heart of Mumbai, the CST is also a ‘World Heritage Site’ declared by UNESCO in 2004. Built in 1888, the station is the grand reminder of the British Raj pre-independence and is still one of the most historical landmarks within the Central Business District (CBD) of Mumbai. A bustling terminus, the CST is well-connected by rail to all parts of the country. It stands as the final result of great industrial revolution technology, merged with Victorian/Gothic revival styles based on late-Italian model architecture. The structure represents the heart of the mercantile facet of the city and also symbolizes the British Commonwealth. Apart from being Victorian-Gothic in architecture, parts of this grand edifice also contain remnants of Mughal styled architecture. An outstanding example of the late 19th century designs, the CST is associated with the city of Mumbai since time immemorial. The city flourished, businesses boomed and a thriving film industry grew, with the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus being the core witness to it all. Scroll down to know more about this treasured structure.

History

The Chhatrapati Shivaji station, formerly known as Victoria Terminus, was built in 1888. Designed by the British architect F.W. Stevens, the structure became a symbol of Bombay (Mumbai) and the city was labeled the ‘Gothic City’ due to this magnificent building’s architectural styles. Apart from being the hub for major mercantile activities, the CST is the perfect amalgam of British and Indian designs. In the past, ‘Bori Bandar’ station, located along the Eastern parts of Mumbai, was the place for commercial exchanges and trading activities. In the 1850’s, the Great Indian Peninsular Railway operated in this area and gave it the name ‘Bori Bandar’, starting its first rail service, covering a total distance of 34 km to Thane.

During the British rule, the station was eventually redesigned and rebuilt by F.W. Stevens, who named it as Victoria Terminus. The station got its name from the then reigning royal, Queen Victoria. The construction of the station took 10 years to complete and was opened to the Queen on the date of her Golden Jubilee in 1887. At the time, the building was the most expensive structure in Mumbai costing 260,000 Sterling Pounds. The station was built to handle main rail traffic and in 1929, a new station and an administrative headquarters were built by the Central Railway. In 1996, the Minister of Railways, Suresh Kalmadi, changed the name of the station to Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (CST).

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